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Irving R. Johnson, Early U.B. Football & Hockey Star

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Irving R. Johnson, Early U.B. Football & Hockey Star

Football 1894, 1895, 1896 (captain)

Irving R. Johnson, Early U.B. Football & Hockey Star

Hockey 1895-96 (captain) 1896-97

Dr. Irving R. Johnson, a 1898 graduate of the University at Buffalo School of Medicine, was an early U.B. sports pioneer excelling in both football and hockey.

Born in Grimsby, Ontario, Canada, Johnson came to the United States as a young man.

In 1894, Dr. Johnson was on the University at Buffalo’s very first football team. By 1896, he was the team captain leading the squad to the championship of Western New York football.

Due to the untiring efforts of Dr. Johnson, in 1895 Buffalo’s first hockey team was organized. Dr. Johnson scheduled and arranged games with the leading Canadian teams. He was also the first hockey captain.

After his playing days, he was regularly assigned to referee major football games in the Buffalo area.

He was a physician and surgeon in Buffalo, N.Y. for 45 years. He died in 1947 of heart disease.

 

1917-1918 Buffalo Basketball

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Captain Louis SiegelAllison RobertsDespite wartime conditions and the loss of several players to the military, Buffalo coach Art Powell led the 1917-1918 U.B. basketball team to a respectable record against quality opponents.  Yale, Colgate and the University of Rochester were among the teams beaten.  The starting five were Don Cohen and Robert Ungerer, forwards; Allison Roberts, center; Louis Siegel and Eugene Leicht, guards.

The biggest game of the year was also the last one of the season.  West Virginia University came to town and was soundly beaten by the smaller and quicker U.B. squad.  (see “Varsity Victor Over Virginians in Closing Game” Buffalo Courier, 22 February 1918)

Students Demand Coach’s Return for Another Year

Powell’s contract with the University of Buffalo athletic authorities expired at the end of the semester.  There was concern that he would move on to other more lucrative opportunities but the undergraduate students and members of the alumni association worked vigorously for his return.

Art Powell did return the following year.  In fact, he coached basketball at U.B. for 28 straight years (1915 – 1943) compiling a 198 – 190 record with a .510 winning percentage.

For more information on basketball at the University at Buffalo, visit the UB Sports History Collection website.


1917-1918 Buffalo Basketball Season

Date Home Team Score Visiting Team W-L-T Location
1/2/19181 Buffalo 21 – 13 Yale University W Buffalo, NY
1/11/19182 Buffalo 17 - 30 Syracuse University L Buffalo, NY
1/18/19183 Buffalo 43 – 5 Fort Niagara W Buffalo, NY
1/25/19184 Buffalo 31 - 16 Colgate University W Buffalo, NY
2/2/19185 Buffalo 27 – 18 University of Rochester W Buffalo, NY
2/9/19186 Buffalo 27 – 32 Allegheny College L Buffalo, NY
2/16/19187 University of Rochester 32 – 34 Buffalo W Rochester, NY
2/21/19188 Buffalo 41 – 23 West Virginia University W Buffalo, NY

FINAL RECORD: 6-2
Home Court: Elmwood Music Hall
Coach
:
Arthur Powell


  • 1 – “U.B. Gives Yale Basketball Team Real ShockBuffalo Courier, Buffalo, NY, 3 January 1918.
  • 2 – “Orange Much Too fast and Clever for Buffalo Collegians“ Rochester Democrat & Chronicle, Rochester, NY, 12 January 1918.
  • 3 – “Varsity Swamps Soldier QuintBuffalo Courier, Buffalo, NY, 19 January 1918.
  • 4 – “U.B. Batters Colgate Five“ Buffalo Courier, Buffalo, NY, 26 January 1918.
  • 5 – “Varsity Whirls Rochester Five to Defeat, 27-18“ Buffalo Courier, Buffalo, NY, 3 February 1918.
  • 6 – “Allegheny Charges to Victory Over VarsityBuffalo Courier, Buffalo, NY, 10 February 1918.
  • 7 – “U. of B. Repeats Win Over RochesterBuffalo Courier, Buffalo, NY, 17 February 1918.
  • 8 – “Varsity Victor Over Virginians in Closing GameBuffalo Courier, Buffalo, NY, 22 February 1918.

Varsity Victor Over Virginians in Closing GameVarsity Victor Over Virginians in Closing Game

Record of Husky Southerners Dimmed by Siegel and Cohen.

END OF SUCCESSFUL SEASON


Playing its last game of the season,
the University of Buffalo last night gave
the much heavier University of West
Virginia a 41 to 23 beating at Elmwood
Music hall.

When the southerners, led by the stocky
Rodgers of All-American football fame,
appeared on the floor the fans had a
glimpse of the huskiest bunch of basketball
tossers that the locals have opposed
this season. But from the first minute
of play, during which time Allie Roberts
slipped in two easy baskets, the locals
demonstrated the fact that brawn was
the only asset of the much heralded visitors.

Don Cohen and Louis Siegel were the
main obstacles in the path of the visitors
bid for victory. Both Cohen and Siegel
were all over the floor and time after
time cut in on the long passes on the
Virginians and shot the ball back toward
their own basket. Siegel’s reverse turns
at the end of long dribbles, had Rodgers
and Whetsell floundering around the floor
throughout the game.

Cohen’s accurate foul shooting, especially
in the first half, was a feature. He
caged nine out of twelve in the first half.
Cutright starred for the Virginians. The
score at half time favored Buffalo 27 to 9.

 

Buffalo Courier, February 22, 1918

1970-1971 Buffalo Bulls Womens Basketball

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1970-1971 Buffalo Bulls Womens Basketball

Front row: Gail Wallen, Arlene Norman, Cynthia Anderson (coach), Shirley Goldin, Sue Patterson
Second row: Kathy Maichrzak, Diane McMahon, Sue Glanville, Leslie Simmons, Holly Hite
Third row: Mary Ellen O’Malley, Deborah Widzieczny, Alice Gayles, Kay Richard, Emily O’Neil, Shannon Manry



1970-1971 Buffalo Bulls Women’s Basketball Season

Home Team Score Visiting Team W-L-T Location
Buffalo  19 – 47 Genesee Community College L Buffalo, NY
Rochester  49 – 46 Buffalo L Rochester, NY
D’Youville College  31 – 37 Buffalo W Buffalo, NY
Brockport State  56 – 32 Buffalo L Brockport, NY
St. Bonaventure University  39 – 32 Buffalo L Olean, NY
Buffalo  43 – 26 Buffalo State College W Buffalo, NY
Canisius College  35 – 46 Buffalo W Buffalo, NY
Buffalo  37 – 17 D’Youville College W Buffalo, NY
Buffalo  46 – 24 Fredonia State W Buffalo, NY
at New York State Tournament  Unknown Unknown W Unknown
at New York State Tournament  Unknown Unknown L Unknown
FINAL RECORD: 6-5

Home Court: Clark Memorial Gymnasium
Coach: Cynthia Anderson

 

Bayard Rustin on University at Buffalo Campus – 1961

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Bayard Rustin - August 1963 - Library of Congress photo

Bayard Rustin

Bayard Rustin was an American leader in social movements for civil rights, socialism, non-violence, and gay rights. Rustin was a leading strategist of the civil rights movement from 1955 to 1968.

On October 27, 1961, he spoke in Norton Hall (now Squire Hall) on the University at Buffalo’s Main Street campus. (see “Rustin Speaking Today in Norton; Folksongs Will Highlight Program” Spectrum Newspaper, 27 October 1961)

Civil Rights – During the event, Rustin discussed civil rights issues.  He clarified the purpose of CORE, the committee on racial equality. It was established, he said, not to alleviate the problems between “the white man and the black man, rather to do something about man’s injustice to his brother.” (see “Core Program Discussed by Rustin at Rally” Spectrum Newspaper, 3 November 1961)

Cold War – Before the Rustin lecture, the U.B. chapter of SANE (the National Committee for a Sane Nuclear Policy) held a demonstration on the steps of Norton Hall condemning Russian nuclear testing. Mr. Rustin spoke briefly on the problem of disarmament.

Three days later, on October 30, 1961, the Soviet Union detonated a 58-megaton yield hydrogen bomb known as Tsar Bomba over northern Russia, in the largest man-made explosion ever.


Rustin Speaking Today in Norton; Folksongs Will Highlight Program Rustin Speaking Today in Norton; Folksongs Will Highlight Program

Bayard Rustin will sing folk songs and speak on “Civil Rights and Non-Violent Mass Action” today at noon in Norton auditorium. Mr. Rustin is currently executive secretary of the War Registers League.  He will also be available for discussion with students and faculty until 12 at a table in a private dining room in Norton.

An early advocate for non-violent mass action for civil rights, Mr. Rustin studied the Gandhi movement in India in 1948-49.  For five years he was advisor and secretary to Martin Luther King. He has traveled widely in Africa, working with Nkrumah in Ghana, Azikiwe in Nigeria, and was arrested 22 times in race struggles. Mr. Rustin had recently returned from three months in Europe where he did preparatory work on the San Francisco-Moscow Walk for Peace.

Traveling under the auspices of the American Friends Service Committee, Mr. Rustin’s appearance at the University is sponsored by the Student Christian Association. Norman Whitney, national director of the peace education section of the American Friends Service Committee will also be available for conversation that morning in the private dining area.

—The Spectrum, October 27, 1961

Core Program Discussed by Rustin at RallyCore Program Discussed
by Rustin at Rally

by Joan Flory

Bayard Rustin, executive secretary of the War Resisters League, and advocate of non-violent mass action for civil rights, spoke last Friday in Norton.

His appearance was sponsored by the Student Christian Association, and the Student Senate Committee, and the Student Senate Committee on Segregation.  A SANE sponsored demonstration on the steps of Norton preceded the lecture. Mr. Rustin spoke briefly on the problem of disarmament.

Richard Fey, vice-president of the Student Senate, read Senate President Les Foshio’s message condemning the Russian nuclear tests. There was also reference to the Soviet threat to explode a 50 megaton bomb. President Foshio was unable to attend the session.

Carl Zietlow, president of the SANE executive committee also addressed the students before the group entered Norton to hear Mr. Rustin speak on “Civil Rights and Non-Violent Mass Action.”

Initially Mr. Rustin clarified the purpose of Core, committee on racial equality. Core was established, he said, not to alleviate the problems between “the white man and the black man, rather to do something about man’s injustice to his brother.”

Core hopes to do away with injustice wherever it exists. First, said Rustin, man must erase the injustice in himself. The meaning of the Negro sit-ins and freedom rides was also discussed. They exist, the civil-right stated, to “make the nation face the facts…we desire integrated schools or no schools.”

When asked about non-violence as a part of their policy, Mr. Rustin said the “non-violence is important to us, for it is the only method capable of challenging and destroying an institution while simultaneously creating a better one.” This type of action was advocated by Gandhi, the Hebrew prophets, and the religious cults of the east.

Commenting on the plight of the Negro, Mr. Rustin recalled a quote from his boyhood: “Son do not worry about the white man, the hunter, being better off than you are. For keeping a man in the gutter you must sit on him, and you are in the gutter too.”

A question period followed in which the speaker elaborated on the civil rights issue in the south, the outbreak of violence, and the conditions prevalent in Harlem schools.

—The Spectrum, November 3, 1961